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Will COVID-19 blood plasma treatments work, and how should we prepare for flu season? Updated: 2020-09-14 06:53:21 KST

South Korea will start mass producing a blood plasma treatment for COVID-19 during September, according to the food and drug safety ministry. Supplies are expected to be ready by next month.
Now antibody treatments are designed to mimic the body's natural response to an invasive virus and disable the threat. Will this be a promising way of treating COVID-19 when a vaccine may still be months away?
Today, I'm joined by Dr. Stanley Perlman, Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Iowa.
We also have Dr. Paul Sambanis, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences at University of Illinois Chicago's School of Public Health.

1. Dr. Perlman: At this point, a growing number of reports are saying a vaccine won't put an immediate end to everything. In that regard, how important is it to first develop a working treatment even if there's an October surprise?


2. Dr. Perlman: South Korea is to start mass producing a blood plasma treatment for Covid-19 as soon as this month. Does scientific evidence show that convalescent plasma is a safe and effective treatment for Covid-19?

3. Dr. Basu: Here in South Korea, we're going through what many call a second wave of the coronavirus. What do you think countries around the world should learn from the first wave, in response to the second?

4. Dr. Perlman: We've heard reports that COVID-19 is mutating in different parts of the world. Are COVID-19 mutations also something scientists need to factor for in drug design? Can you tell us more about that process?

5. Dr. Basu: How worried should we be about COVID-19 evolving?

6. Dr. Perlman: What are the risks of blood plasma treatments? Might there be any side effects? What don't we know about the treatment right now?

7. Dr. Basu: How should authorities prepare the public health system for a second, and even third wave of the coronavirus, especially with the flu season coming up?

8. Dr. Perlman: In the U.S., there's a lot of talk around the possibility of a vaccine being developed by October. Should we be optimistic or cautious about this?

That was Dr. Stanley Perlman, Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Iowa.
and Dr. Paul Sambanis, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences at University of Illinois Chicago's School of Public Health..



Reporter : osy@arirang.com
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