Other Stories

Russia reportedly completes world's first COVID-19 vaccine human trials Updated: 2020-07-13 13:20:40 KST


As countries around the world pour all their efforts into winning the race to develop a COVID-19 vaccine, Russia has reportedly completed clinical trials, proving the effectiveness of the vaccine.
Quoting the head of the Center for Clinical Research on Medications at Sechenov University, Russia's news agency TASS reported Sunday that the research is done and they've proved the vaccine is safe.
The volunteers who participated in the trials will be discharged on July 15th and 20th, and will remain under medical supervision after being sent home.
There was, however, no further information on when this vaccine, developed by the country's Gamaleya National Research Center for Epidemiology and Microbiology, would enter commercial production.
Meanwhile, German scientists have found that COVID-19 antibodies may not last longer than a few months, dampening hopes for long-term immunity.
An antibody study carried out by a medical clinic in Munich showed that in four of the nine patients, there has been a significant drop in the amount of neutralizing antibodies.
This suggests that recovered patients can contract the virus again.
Against this backdrop, experts in the U.S. say an antibody-rich blood plasma injection could be the next best thing to an effective COVID-19 vaccine.
According to the LA Times, American scientists think this could be the most plausible treatment as of now, as the method has proven successful in preventing other infectious diseases such as hepatitis A.
The paper, however, explained that there's a lack of support at the federal government level, as many think plasma-based therapies should focus on treating patients who are already sick, rather than preventing infections among healthy people.
Kim Hyo-sun, Arirang News.
KOGL : Korea Open Government License
본 저작물 중 본문에 해당하는 뉴스 스크립트(텍스트)는 공공누리 제1유형-출처표시 조건에 따라 이용할 수 있습니다.
weather