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Protests, calls for justice continue over death of George Floyd Updated: 2020-06-02 05:36:36 KST

We begin a discussion on an issue making headlines.
Unrest continues across U.S. cities, as protestors fill the streets in anger and grief over the death of George Floyd, an African American man who died after a white police officer pressed his knee into his neck.
His death has caused sadness and despair around the world, shedding light on police abuse based on racism and discrimination.
At the same time, some of the protests in the U.S. have descended into violence, causing more upset and disorder across the American society.
And just before this show, an official autoposy declared Floyd's death a result of homocide.
We discuss this issue today with Jared K. Clemons, a PHD candidate at Duke University studying the politics of racial justice, and Charles Zelden, Professor of History and Political Science at Nova Southeastern University.

Mr Clemons: Footage of George Floyd’s killing and the civil unrest that has followed in Minneapolis are also painful reminders of a much older tape. Nearly 30 years after the police beating of Rodney King, as well as numerous police brutality towards black men and women caught on tape in between, the rage and despair remain familiar. But what's the difference between then and now? And what hasn't changed since then?

Mr. Cleons: Protests also took place in North Carolina where you are. It's where George Floyd was born. How has this affected your community?

Dr. Zelden: What caused the protests against police violence to spiral into violence and looting?

Dr. Zelden: President Trump blamed anarchists and the group Antifa for fueling the violence, while Attorney General William Barr blamed “far left extremist” groups. What do you make of the administration's reaction?

To both: What kind of impact is this having on the American public amid the COVID-19 outbreak?

Dr. Zelden: What steps should the government take to root out police violence?

Mr. Cleons: What needs to be done to remove the systematic discrimination and racism that's embedded in America's law enforcement?

Dr. Zelden: The ex-policemen who killed George Floyd was charged with third degree murder but many believe that is too light and are calling for a first degree charge. What will determine the final sentence?

This is where we'll have to wrap up the discussion. It's been a meaningful discussion.
Jared K. Clemons, a PHD candidate at Duke University studying the politics of racial justice, and Charles Zelden, Professor of History and Political Science at Nova Southeastern University.
Thank you for joining us.

Reporter : osy@arirang.com
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